6 Doors Covers You May Not Have Heard

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Thursday, December 1, 2016
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6 Doors Covers You May Not Have Heard

Today is the birthday of John Densmore, drummer for The Doors, and given our pride in the band’s back catalog, you probably knew we were going to pay tribute to him with a post. Thing is, we already spotlighted some of his non-Doors project for his last birthday, so we thought, “What can we do different this year?” Instead, we decided to spotlight six Doors covers that you might not have heard. Here’s hoping at least a few of these are new to you!

1. Johnny Mathis, “Light My Fire” (1968): Although it unabashedly cribs from Jose Feliciano’s hit arrangement of the song, the fact that there’s a Doors cover by Mathis at all is remarkable enough to make it worth mentioning.

2. Adam Ant, “Hello I Love You” (1982): Earlier this year, David Chiu of Medium.com wrote of “Killer in the Home” from KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER that it “easily could have been something that the Doors might have recorded.” If that was an intentional sonic nod on Ant’s part, then it could explain what inspired him to actually cover a Doors song on his 1982 solo album FRIEND OR FOE.

3. Frankie Goes To Hollywood, “Roadhouse Blues” (1986): For anyone who only knows Frankie for singles like “Relax” and “Two Tribes,” the idea of the group tackling a Doors track might seem inconceivable, but given their remarkably sold version of Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” on their debut album, WELCOME TO THE PLEASUREDOME, it’s at least marginally less startling that they released this as a B-side to their 1986 single “Rage Hard.”

4. Brave Combo, “People Are Strange” (1987): Sure, we could’ve opted for Echo and the Bunnymen’s take on this creepy classic, but everyone who’s seen The Lost Boys has heard that one. Instead, we thought, “Why not give a little love to some hard-working Texan polka rockers instead?” So we did.

5. The Escape Club, “20th Century Fox” (1989): After scoring a pair of top-40 hits from their Atlantic Records debut – no, “Wild Wild West” wasn’t a one-off, but history hasn’t been terribly kind to “Shake for the Sheik, which hit #28 – The Escape Club’s profile was high enough that they were selected to cover this Doors song, which was released as the single from the soundtrack to the ABC series The Wonder Years. Alas, they didn’t earn another hit from it, but they still landed on their feet: in 1991, they returned to the top-10 (for the last time) with “I’ll Be There.”

6. Nico, “The End” (2004): What song did you think we’d use to wrap up this piece? To keep things in the proper chronological order, however, we opted for a live version by Nico which was recorded in Tokyo on April 11, 1986 but didn’t see release until 2004, when NICO: ALL TOMORROW’S PARTIES finally made it to record store shelves.