Digital Roundup: 5/7/14

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014
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Digital Roundup: 5/7/14

New this week in the iTunes Rhino Catalog Room:

Force M.D.’s, Love Letters: Wait, didn’t all of the Force M.D.’s albums hit the digital catalog back in April? Well, we thought they did, but apparently there was some sort of holdup with this one. That, or maybe we just got confused because the guys are wearing the same attire on this album as they do on Let Me Love You: The Greatest Hits. Either way, now you can own their top-10 R&B hit “Tears” in the context of the album on which it originally appeared, so hooray!

Albert King, King of the Blues Guitar (Mono): We here at Rhino are kicking off a new weekly reissue program called Mono Monday, and don’t overthink this, because it’s exactly what it sounds like: we’re adding a new mono release to the digital catalog every week. Starting us out is the classic compilation blues guitarist Albert King. If you’re not a purist, then the idea of listening to an album in glorious mono may not mean much to you, but we know our audience well enough to realize that there’s plenty of you out there who’ll be anxious to see what’s going to be coming down the pike each week. Why, it almost makes Mondays worth looking forward to. Not quite…but almost.

Sweet Water, Sweet Water/Superfriends: There’s good news and bad news when you’re a musician whose city is suddenly determined to have a “scene”: there’s a constant interest in any album that anyone from the city releases, but it’s also easy for the media to sneer and say, “Oh, people only like that band because they’re from the [INSERT CITY NAME HERE] scene!” Boy, that sure did sum up Sweet Water’s story, didn’t it? Being from Seattle got them signed to Atlantic Records, and their self-titled 1993 debut – produced by Tim Palmer – picked up a few fans with its first single, “Everything Will Be Alright,” but it was their second major-label effort, 1995’s Superfriends, that should’ve been a big hit, thanks to songs like “Cake and Strychnine,” “Superstar,” “Adeline,” “No Syrup for Your Pancakes,” and “Self Hater.” Regrettably, it was not a big hit, which inevitably led to the end of Sweet Water’s time as part of the WEA family of labels, but both albums are worth revisiting for fans of ‘90s rock.

Winger, The Very Best of Winger: The level of respect accorded to the heavy metal band Winger can be best summed up by the fact that Beavis and Butthead’s neighbor, Stewart, the perpetual victim of the duo’s ridicule, could constantly be seen wearing a t-shirt sporting the band’s name, but be that as it may, Winger earned two platinum albums – their self-titled debut in 1988 and the 1990 follow-up, In the Heart of the Young – and three top-40 singles (“Seventeen,” “Headed for a Heartbreak,” and “Miles Away”). This compilation, making its belated digital debut, includes all of those singles as well as 13 other tracks, making it way more Winger than a casual fan might want, but if you liked the band’s music back in the day and don’t want to invest in all of their individual albums, this is the only way to go.