Happy Birthday: Don Everly

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Wednesday, February 1, 2017
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Happy Birthday: Don Everly

When it comes to heavenly harmonies throughout the history of rock ‘n’ roll, few others compare to those created by the voices of Don and Phil Everly. Not that we don’t believe this to be true on every day of the year, but today’s a particularly good day to remember it, as it’s Don Everly’s birthday. To celebrate the occasion, we’ve put together a six-pack of tracks that feature vocal contribution from Don, none of which are Everly Brothers songs. That’s not to say that Phil isn’t occasionally in the mix, but so few people are aware of the work Don did under the “Everly Brothers” banner that we thought this would be a fine time to spotlight some of it.

1. The Jonas Fjeld Band, “Tiger” – Hailing from Norway, Jonas Field has found a higher profile in recent years as a result of his collaborative albums with Rick Danko and Eric Andersen, but in the ‘70s, he was fronting his own band. Given their folky nature, you can imagine how thrilled he was to secure Don for backing vocals on this track.

2. Guy Clark, “The Houston Kid” – Taken from the self-titled affair that was Clark’s third album. Other notables on the album include Albert Lee and Rodney Crowell.

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3. Bryn Haworth, “Woman Friend” – A rock legend known only to real guitar geeks, Haworth was a member of Les Fleur de Lys, a house band for Atlantic Records in the late 1960s. In ’69, he left the band and headed to California, ultimately founding a new band called Wolfgang, but he signed his first solo deal in 1973. This track is from his third album, Grand Arrival.

4. Emmylou Harris, “Every Time You Leave” – It makes perfect sense that Harris performed a duet with Don, especially when you learn that she once went on record as saying that she wanted herself and Linda Ronstadt to be “the Everly Sisters.)

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5. Albert Lee, “Billy Tyler” – The Jonas Fjeld Band’s album was the only time Everly worked on a record with Albert Lee; on at least one occasion, Everly actually played on one of Lee’s own albums.

Listen Here – Mr. Cash and the Everlys go a long way back, having found success at around the same time, but it wasn’t until the 1980s that the brothers contributed harmonies to one of Cash’s albums.