Happy Birthday: Phil Lesh

THIS IS THE ARTICLE FULL TEMPLATE
Wednesday, March 15, 2017
THIS IS THE FIELD NODE IMAGE ARTICLE TEMPLATE
Happy Birthday: Phil Lesh

It was on this date in 1940 that bassist Phil Lesh, one of the founding members of The Grateful Dead, was born in Berkeley, California. Needless to say, this is effectively a holiday for Deadheads, providing the band’s fans with a legitimate excuse to crank up their favorite studio albums or live performances and send good vibes in Phil’s general direction. If you can’t decide on a particular favorite, then we’ve got the official Grateful Dead playlist ready for you, but in addition to that, we’ve also got a three-pack of tracks that aren’t Dead songs that feature Phil contributing in some capacity. Whether you can actually hear him or not, we can assure you that he’s there, so just give these songs a spin and wish him a happy birthday, won’t you?

1. Graham Nash, “I Used To Be A King” (1971): One of many songs inspired by the breakup between Nash and Joni Mitchell, Lesh was credited as a co-writer on the track and also played bass.

SPOTIFY: Listen Here

2. David Crosby, “What Are Their Names” (1971): In an interview with Mojo Magazine, Crosby reflected on the making of his solo album, IF I COULD ONLY REMEMBER MY NAME. “There’s a lot of joy on that record, because that’s where I needed desperately to go,” he recalled. “Graham Nash came a lot, Jerry Garcia came even more, almost every night – he was a good friend and he liked it that I was as open to the accident of music as he was. Phil [Lesh] came very often, Jorma [Kaukonen], Grace [Slick], Paul [Kantner], Joni [Mitchell]… They were all friends. It saved me. Because I could dive into making that music and spend a whole night stacking harmonies on myself, being the Mormon Tabernacle me, and it would elevate me out of the hole that I was in.”

SPOTIFY: Listen Here

3. Bob Weir, “Mexicali Blues” (1972): Finding a member of The Grateful Dead on a solo album by another member of The Grateful Dead is a little bit like shooting fish in a barrel, given how often the guys collaborated both in and out of the band. Weir’s ACE, however, is effectively a Grateful Dead album in everything but name. This particular track is a cowboy song, one which clearly takes its cues from Marty Robbins’ “El Paso.” This is not a bad thing.

SPOTIFY: Listen Here