News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 10:10am

New this week in the Rhino Room at iTunes:

The B-52’s, The Video Album: You’ve gotten your groove on to the music, but now’s your chance to dance this mess around while watching the videos! There are 15 videos included on this compilation, and since we know you’re wondering what they are, we won’t force you to wait another minute: you’ll get “Rock Lobster,” “Song for a Future Generation,” “Legal Tender,” “Girl from Ipanema Goes to Greenland,” “Channel Z,” “Love Shack,” “Cosmic Thing,” “Roam,” “Deadbeat Club,” “Good Stuff,” “Tell It Like It T-I-IS,” “Is That You, Mo-Dean?”, “Hot Pants Explosion,” “Revolution Earth,” and “Debbie.” It’s a full-on party in convenient video form!

Rick James, “This Magic Moment / Dance with Me”: Depending on how long your memory may be, it’s not impossible that you might remember this track from Warner Brothers’ 1989 compilation, Rock, Rhythm & Blues, which also featured covers by Elton John, Michael McDonald, Chaka Chan, Howard Hewett, Manhattan Transfer, Randy Travis, the Pointer Sisters, Christine McVie and Friends, and El Debarge. Why did this track get a single release? Say, you don’t think maybe it’s to continue with the Rick James revival we tried to start a few weeks ago by issuing his Kickin’ album at long last, do you? Yeah, that’s the ticket!

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Tuesday, August 26, 2014 - 11:34am

Once upon a time, it was considered vaguely preposterous that rock ‘n’ roll and classical musical could ever be brought together successfully, but in 1969, Jon Lord of Deep Purple decided to prove them wrong, composing a concerto – with lyrics by bandmate Ian Gillan – and, along with their bandmates (Ritchie Blackmore, Roger Glover, and Ian Paice), performing it with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra on September 24, 1969 at the Royal Albert Hall.

The end result of that performance, Concerto for Group and Orchestra, is now available once more, and on 180-gram vinyl, no less. The reissue mirrors the version which emerged on EMI in 2002, which is to say that it includes the entire program of music performed on September 24, 1969, rather than merely the concerto. The evening began with “Symphony No. 6, Op. 95,” composed by Malcolm Arnold, who also conducted the proceedings, after which the audience was favored with a trio of Deep Purple songs – “Hush,” “Wring That Neck,” and “Child in Time” – before moving on to the three movements of “Concerto for Group and Orchestra.” For an encore, the orchestra and company returned to perform parts of the third movement.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 4:22pm

The Return of Rock Royalty
THE BRITISH INVASION
Sharing the stage for the first time ever, the iconic singers of the legendary
1960’s rock revolution:
Gerry & The Pacemakers
Chad & Jeremy
Billy J. Kramer
Mike Pender’s Searchers
Denny Laine (of The Moody Blues & Wings)
and SPECIAL GUEST: Peter Asher (of Peter & Gordon)

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Tuesday, August 19, 2014 - 1:17pm

"Aqualung,""Thick As A Brick,""Cross Eyed Mary,""Locomotive Breath"... Who wants to hear the best of Jethro Tull (and some new tunes from Ian Anderson!) live this fall? Enter to win a pair of tickets to hear their hits in a city near you.

Thursday, August 7, 2014 - 4:10pm

This week, we’re offering a 180-gram vinyl reissue of the sophomore full-length effort by the Waterboys, the first one featuring songs recorded with what is generally viewed as the definitive lineup of the group: Mike Scott, Anthony Thistlethwaite, Kevin Wilkinson, and Karl Wallinger, who would later go on to form his own band, World Party.

Sharing its title with an Edna O’Brien novel which Mike Scott, who named the album and wrote the title track, has never actually read, the first sessions for A Pagan Place took place in November 1982, but they only featured Scott, Thistlethwaite, and Wilkinson. By the time the band returned to record the remainder of the album, almost a year had passed (the second sessions didn’t take place until September 1983), and in addition to having added Wallinger to the lineup, the band had also released their self-titled album and scored their first chart hit with “A Girl Called Johnny.”