Monday, November 16, 2015 - 3:00pm

Led Zeppelin, Joy Division, Faces, AND Van Halen special edition vinyl - does it get any better than that? We think not. Throw your name in the hat for this month's Greatest Hits Giveaway by simply following the Topsify Greatest Hits playlist on Spotify via the link below.

Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:29pm
A few weeks ago, Rhino released Soul Manifesto, a 12-disc box set dedicated to the career of the one and only Otis Redding, a man we described as one of the defining voices in '60s R&B. Now it's time for another instant record collection for one of the other defining voices in '60s R&B…and '70s R&B…and so it goes through the decades, all the way up to the present, because no one has ever argued with Aretha Franklin's title as the Queen of Soul. (Not without hearing a few choice words about how wrong they are, anyway.)
Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:15pm
Did we just hear you say life’s taking you nowhere? We certainly hope we didn’t, angel, because we’ve got somewhere that life can take you today: to the record store to pick up a copy of the 40th Anniversary 7” Picture Disc of David Bowie’s “Golden Years.”
Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 12:40pm
Rhino has made it a point to reissue classic albums on 180-gram vinyl on a regular basis. These are the latest to get that treatment. You're welcome.

Duran Duran, Notorious: The band's fourth album is better known for being their first album after the original Fab Five - Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes, Andy Taylor, John Taylor, and Roger Taylor - devolved into a three-piece after Andy and Roger departed the ranks. (Technically, Andy is on the album, but he's not on much of it, and even at that, he's not credited as a proper member.) At the time, there was understandable skepticism that Duran Duran would be able to soldier on successfully, but they defied whatever odds were deemed to have been against them and sent three singles into the Billboard Hot 100: the title track, “Skin Trade,” and “Meet El Presidente.”

Monday, November 2, 2015 - 2:46pm
Once upon a time, there was a band called Uncle Tupelo that helped define the musical genre known as “Americana,” and if you disagree with this premise, the editors of No Depression would probably like to have a word with you. After four albums, Uncle Tupelo split, with its two predominant musical forces going in different directions: Jeff Tweedy went off to start a little group called Wilco, while Jay Farrar—who actually left first, just for the record—started his own band.